Six on Saturday - June 20, 2020

First off, I want to say "Happy Birthday" to my middle child, and only daughter!

Happy Birthday!

Now, back to gardening topics for this Six on Saturday.

Thanks to The Propagator gardeners or garden enthusiasts, or plant people, or just anyone who has an interest in garden related things can gather each Saturday to share six favorites.  


 In my zone 8b garden in Southern Oregon the weather has finally turned warm again.  Not hot, like many late Junes can be, but nice enough for shorts, and hot enough to stop gardening in the afternoon.

1 -  The Toss Garden

The second summer for my Toss Garden, which got its start with seed heads literally tossed into the bare area, along with leftover seeds.  Mostly black-eyed Susan grew, and grew, and grew.  I experimented on them this past winter to see if they were perennials.  I've always treated them as annuals, but they aren't! The dormant plants are quite ugly, but this area isn't seen from any windows, so ugly doesn't matter.

The plants are healthy, tall, and sturdier than last year.  There are quite a few perennial coreopsis, as well as some annual tall plains coreopsis from seeds I tossed a few months ago.  There are young knautia, new this year, and a few still mystery seedlings.  And borage, lots and lots of borage, starting its second generation so far this season.


2 - Shirley Poppies 

The front yard had masses of poppy seedlings from the Dollar Tree packets labeled Cottage Garden and Flower Garden. I neglected to write down what seeds were in the packs.  I assumed the poppies would be the red corn poppies like in their Pollinator Mix boxes.  Pretty, but I didn't want a lot of them.  So, I pulled out dozens.  Now, they are blooming, and they are the pretty pink subspecies of corn poppies, Shirley poppies.  They can be white, pink, or red.


Here some of them are with perennial coreopsis, alyssum, and rather pale Siskiyou Pink gaura.


3 - Tomatoes

I almost gave up on my tomatoes started from seed!  Now, comparing to last year's purchased plant, they are right on target.  And, I will admit, not only the ones I started indoors on heat mats and then a gro-light, but the ones grown as a "let's see what happens, but I don't believe they'll do well" wintersown experiment too!  Yes, the ones sown in a milk jug are doing just as well as the ones I fussed over!  Guess that means I won't bother taking up my kitchen counter space with messy seed trays next winter!
Mashenka 



Marshmallow in Chocolate


The three Wintersown: 

The sticks separating the varieties in the milk jug got shifted, so I won't know what these are until they fruit, but they are either Masheka, Marshmallow in Chocolate or Pineapple. 




4 -Bonanza Daylily

It's hard to get the color to photograph on my phone.  It's actually more of a cantaloupe color.  This is one I got when I divided the original two Bonanzas in the front yard in October 2018.  Don't you just love plants that give you more free plants?




5 - Italian Flat Leaf Parsley

Finally.  The parsley took forever to grow this year!  It failed the first several plantings, and even the wintersown ones failed to survive transplanting.  This is one of the herb markers I got at Goodwill this past winter.



6 - Hidcote Lavender

I have five Hidcote lavender plants under the front windows.  They were planted in 2014, replacing super ugly, spider-web festooned junipers.  They've grown just a bit!  The house is yellow, so these really stand out.


Until next Saturday then. 

Comments

  1. What a lovely show of lavender. I too struggled with parsley. Here we can buy growing parsley for the kitchen shelf from supermarkets. I just buy one of these, and divide it up into four or five, and have enough parsley and more, for a whole year! Just a suggestion.....

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    1. What's funny is, I don't even use parsley often! I guess I do use it more if I have it in the garden though. I have one delicious turkey loaf recipe that uses quite a bit of it.

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  2. Gorgeous carpet of black-eyed Susan ! They are so easy to grow and they are worth it... Nice daylily and lavender.
    Happy birthday to your daughter 🎁 !( without being intrusive, how old is she? )

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    1. Yes, they are super easy, they grow themselves! I used to fuss over them.
      My two youngest children are in their 20s, the oldest is quite a bit older than they are.

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  3. A couple of years ago I didn't sow any tomato seeds or buy any plants but enough came up in the garden compost to give us a reasonable quantity! Meanwhile, I can't get parsley to grow from seed so I cheat and buy a pot from the supermarket, split it and use the plants for a couple of years quite successfully. Your lavender hedge is lovely,I am pleased with mine each year.......apparently, it doesn't like clay soil. Well,mine is very hard clay.

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    1. I had a Roma tomato from the compost heap one year. Usually I get pumpkins. One year I had lots of acorn squash. Potatoes always start but don't last. It's always fun to see what grows from our trash!

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  4. The Shirley poppy is gorgeous. The petals are so delicate yet richly coloured, like hand painted silk. I love the idea of the 'toss' garden.

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    1. I like the pink much more than the red. They are smaller plants too. I usually have some extra seeds I don't want to bother saving, so I toss them too! I think maybe I'm feeding the birds!

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  5. Hello from Washington! I'm more like a 7b because of elevation and you look pleasantly warm by comparison! Congrats on a successful Toss Graden. Great idea.

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    1. It was warmer (90s) a few weeks ago, then got cold and stormy last week. I think we're back to normal now!

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  6. The toss garden is a huge success. You can't go wrong with that much colour in a garden - it's just so happy and sunny.

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    1. It really did surprise me how well it grew last year and coming back now. All those instructions on how to plant seeds, when they fall on the ground naturally, without being 1/4" or 1/8, or just covered, deep!

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  7. I think the Toss Garden is a great idea! I d love the Shirley poppies - such gentle colours. The Lavender is just gorgeous!!Unfortunately it one of those plants that I don't have much success with.

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    1. That's too bad about lavender. I do live in what they call a "Mediterranean Climate," and while it's called French or English, it's actually Mediterranean. It does get too cold in winter for the lacy French leaved kinds though.
      The Shirley poppies open new colors daily, they area incredible! Good thing they have attractive seed pods, so I can leave them! CA poppy seeds pods are ugly, but I leave them too.

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