Six on Saturday - October 3, 2020

First, a "Happy Birthday" to my youngest, who is 25 today!

Now, on to Six on Saturday, brought to us by The Propagator

https://thepropagatorblog.wordpress.com/2020/10/03/six-on-saturday-03-10-2020/

 1 - A View From the Back

The masses of flowers have thinned considerably, but there are still enough to keep the bees happy.  The middle bed is the Polllinator Garden.  In front of the yellow tuteur is the Butterfly Garden, not much left there. In the background of the Mexican red sunflowers is the Toss Garden, you can just see the dead black-eyed Susan seed heads.  The best color is in the square bed on the right, which used to be a fruit tree bed.

2 - Harvestmen

Harvestmen are not spiders, but members of the family Opilione, which in turn is in the order of  Arachnida (spiders and scorpions too).  These are often called Daddy-Long-Legs.  The spiders that hang around at the ceiling of your rooms are not the same thing,  they are cellar spiders. Harvestmen lack silk or venom glands, and have only two eyes.  Another difference is they do not suck like spiders, but ingest small pieces of their food.

3 - Honey Bee and Lavender

The Ellagance Snow lavender is blooming for a second time.  Lavenders are among insects' favorite flowers, some varieties coming in third after agastache and oregano in studies.

4 - Bed #5 

I tore out a pineapple tomato once I found it was a pineapple tomato.  It was one that grew from seed in a container that lost its label.  I have had enough of pineapple tomatoes (see #6)!  Remaining in the bed are two kalettes, a coreopsis, spent gladiola, a volunteer wild grape, and a dogwood stuck in as a stick for want of a better place.

5 - Daylily Propagation

I am quite pleased with the daylilies I grew from seed this past winter/spring!  They were wintersown 

 https://lisasgardenadventureinoregon.blogspot.com/2018/12/winter-sowing-season-begins.html

from seeds I gathered last fall at the library.  I was going to let them stay in the small containers, since they go dormant, but fortunately noticed roots peeking out the bottoms.  Daylilies may not bloom true by seed, but I'm hoping at least some of the surviving seven plants will be large and lemon yellow.


 
6 -  Pineapple Tomatoes
 
 I'd complain about "too much of a good thing," if I liked these tomatoes.  I don't.  So, naturally, the one plant I let bear fruit had a tremendous amount of huge tomatoes!  Very pretty, but not my idea of home-grown tomato taste.

So, I picked them all, tore out the plant, and roasted the tomatoes.  I had no oregano basil (as you know, I cannot grow it!) or onions, so just pureed the roasted tomatoes and froze the result.  I can add the seasonings when I need to.  I got six cups.  I don't bother seeding or peeling, the blender does a nice job.  There's a couple nice dark Marshmallow in Chocolate cut up in there too.  Now, those are tasty!

Hope you all have a nice weekend. 
 
Stay safe and wear those masks! Just look at the US President as a cautionary tale of refusing to wear them!


Comments

  1. My pineapple tomatoes are not that color. They are more yellow but on the other hand they have the same size. You can see a photo here if the link works : https://twitter.com/frdvil/status/1021489323236093953?s=20 Otherwise I like the 2 "Eiffel Towers" of the first photo!😂👍🏻🗼

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    1. Yes, yours is much more yellow. A few were less red. I have seeds left from this year, but I am not going to grow Pineapple again! The boxes did call those "Eiffel Tower" tuteurs!

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    2. really ?! That's fun !😄

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  2. You've got plenty blooming there, Lisa. I've been happily noting all the bees in the garden these weeks as well. Feels like I need a class in identifying pollinators since I'm pretty weak in that area. Happy Birthday to your youngest! It's harder to celebrate in the midst of COVID, right? Our youngest turned 27 a month ago.

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    1. I spend a lot of time trying to figure out different pollinators! Things I think are bees are hover flies, and some things look not quite right for even honey bees! My son isn't one for parties, so he didn't mind!

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  3. Lovely view from the back, and it’s always encouraging to see so many flowers still looking healthy at this time of year.

    Your daylilles have great roots on them - I hope your new plants will flower in the colours that you want, but whatever colour they are, it’s a success story, and especially when you’ve grown them from free seed.

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    1. I was thrilled to see those roots! I keep an old pill bottle in the car to put seeds I come across in!

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  4. I'm impressed with you being able to grow day lilies from seed.
    So the Marshmallow in Chocolate are the tomatoes to grow then. I remember you mentioning them at the start of the season, as it's such an unusual name.

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    1. I try to grow one new tomato every year (didn't last year, I bought one Early Girl, I don't remember why), and I was taken by the name too. Seeds from my own daylilies didn't even germinate.

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  5. I've never heard of either of those tomatoes. I'll give them a try next spring.

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    1. I also grew Mashenka, which looks pretty much like Marshmallow in Chocolate, but a bit more red. A really good one is Hoskins-Barger.

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  6. What interesting information on the Harvestmen. I’m not sure if we have any here in Australia; I will have to look that up! I have not heard of pineapple tomato, and I am impressed by the size of the crop you harvested! Such a pity that you don’t like their taste. We are only able to grow cherry tomatoes here due to the heat and humidity, and only recently have we had some luck with a larger unknown variety.

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    1. Yes, a very impressive crop... I didn't taste the puree I froze, but it will be fine in recipes. Maybe not in large amounts, like a pasta sauce, but for pizza.

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  7. Love this close up view of your garden. What is the yellow tuteur? Not familiar with this word. Looks like a big easel or trellis? Surprised you cannot grow oregano. Good drainage and plenty of sun is the key. I figure if I can grow it in Seattle, you can grow it in Oregon!

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    1. Oh my! I edited the post to say "basil," not "oregano!" I can grow oregano without trying! It grows itself! I have Hot & Spicy, zaatar, golden, Greek Mountain, and an unknown type.
      Yes, a tuteur is a type of trellis, like a tower.

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