Six on Saturday - November 21, 2020

 It's been wet and cold and dark and miserable and often windy outside.  So, I don't have much to offer on this 

Six on Saturday!

https://thepropagatorblog.wordpress.com/2020/11/21/six-on-saturday-21-11-2020/

1 - Water

The reason most everything is planted in raised beds.  This is what clay soil does in the rain.  Nothing.  It will get twice as deep.  Time to break out the rubber boots.  That bed is the Pollinator Garden.  It isn't level, so seeds get washed to the side seen here.  Most of the seedling type greenery seen here are volunteer Chinese Forget-me-Not.  Inside the rock circle is one of my new Rose Marvel sages. 

2 - Mystery

Want to help me out?  Two of these came up in late spring in the Pollinator Garden.  They grew very slowly, and never bloomed, so I guess they are biennial or perennial.  But, biennial or perennial what?  Suggestions might jog my memory of what I sowed here!  I'm thinking something that was in a mixed pollinator flower seed packet.

3 - Dragon's Blood Stonecrop

The plant isn't attractive right now, very leggy, but the ends have beautiful, shiny red leaves.  This was here when I moved in, and it's adapted to life in the herb garden.

4 - Tri-Color Stonecrop

Another cold weather beauty, I bought this one and turned it loose in the front yard and the herb garden.  Succulents there are limited to the edges of the beds.  This one is a cutting I'm rooting in a terracotta planter.  You can see it has bare stems too, in the shadows on the right.

5 - More Stonecrop

I can really tell the difference between 'Angelina' and 'Blue Spruce' this time of year.  (Obviously the one that isn't blue is 'Angelina'!) 'Angelina' in other containers is quite a bit more yellow than these.

6 - Gummosis

I can't be the only gardener who can't grow fruit trees.  I prune and spray like advised, and still... My cherry up and died for no reason, borers got the apple, now my peach and pluot both have "gummies."  The pluot also has leaf curl, a disease caused by aphids.  The rain has really brought the ooze out.  The peach was diagnosed with bacterial canker, which can cause gummosis, about five years ago (I've had it six) and I was told it would eventually kill it.  It also had misshapen and misplaced (only growing on the branch halves nearest the trunk) leaves this past spring, no fruit. I will give them one more year, with spraying according to directions. If no fruit, I quit! 

 
Enjoy the rest of your weekend and happy gardening!

Comments

  1. I do like your the rock circles, I will have to find this kind of thing because it's original and effective.
    Regarding to your cherry tree and peach tree , you say that you sprayed them but with what? And how often?
    For my part, I spray copper sulphate (in France we name it "Bouillie Bordelaise"). It's organic as they say.
    Spraying before the buds open then at 10 and 20 days and similar when leaves drop in autumn ( 6 spraying per year)
    I still have a few leaf roll disease but I can eat lots of fruit

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know one of the sprays is copper. The other, I don't remember, it's in the shed. I believe they say to use the twice. I know once on the peach is before bud break.
      The peach had loads of fruit last year.

      Delete
  2. You have quite a variety of plants. I took a photo off my screen of the mystery plant and used the iNaturalist app. It said it amy be Garlic Mustard.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I does look a bit like that, but I think those leaves are pointier. Thanks so much for looking!

      Delete
  3. I have clay soil too, but built the garden beds up and that seems to help. Like you I have a lot of water lying around when it rains. You might have helped me identify some plants I have which look very much like yoyr stonecrop, thank you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Someone today shared their pond, and I was thinking I could dig trenches to divert all the water to a pond! It's worth a try.

      Delete
  4. Love your stonecrops. Wonderful that you have found a way of growing them when you are disadvantaged like that. I have clay soil too, so I understand your 'issues'! Had to look 'pluot' up - so it's a plum/apricot hybrid? Amazing!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, a plum/apricot, and the best thing I've ever tasted! Mine is Flavor Supreme, which is a nice dark red inside.

      Delete
  5. The tricolour stonecrop is very pretty - the pale pink against the pale jade. We get the puddles here too in our clay soil. You have my sympathy.

    ReplyDelete
  6. We have heavy clay too, so I know how awful it is. It doesn’t puddle any more, so I think maybe all the years of adding stuff to it are making a difference. But it’s still awful to plant into when it’s cold and soaking wet.

    I hope springtime brings you an abundance of fruit on your trees!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The clay area in my yard was a big flat nothing, so not really set up for amendments. Fortunately, the sitting water is not near the house. I even peeked under the house, nervous, last year, and it was dry! There's a plastic barrier of some kind.

      Delete
  7. Sorry you've had such trouble with fruit trees. Maybe you'll get something to grow someday.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I do okay with blueberries and raspberries, just not the trees. My father made it looks so easy. He knew how to prune correctly.

      Delete
  8. Fruit tree disease, ugh. My plums had the same thing, and they are gone now. One garden writer said growing fruit was best left to the professionals, but wow, when you get a crop it's so satisfying. Your clay is really something! At least the water goes into my muck!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Fortunately, the front yard and near the house in the back isn't that way. The front doesn't dry out closest to the house all winter though, the house shades it. Which reminds me, past time to clean the gutters! And put the hoses in the carport. The faucets are covered already.

      Delete

Post a Comment

Popular Posts