L - Lovely!

 

Lavender 

Here are three of my lavenders.   I also have several Hidcote lavenders along the front of my house, a Goodwin Creek Grey in a pot, and two white ones, White Grosso (quite large), and Ellagance Snow (quite small).  Goodwin Creek Grey is my tender lavender, a hybrid with French lavender in its breeding (although I believe it is a natural hybrid found at the nursery, not bred).  French lavenders are too tender for my zone, which is a shame, they have beautiful lacy leaves.  (If you are doing the scavenger hunt and you can't find anything better, perhaps my mention of "leaves" will do!)

Platinum Blonde

Munstead

Mini Blue 

Mini Blue is small enough to stay in a container.  Not a tiny container.

 
Lithodora
 
Just look at that blue!  It's pretty much the blue of my front door.
 

Lobelia

Not Crystal Palace, my favorite, which I have had trouble finding lately (not lately lately, I didn't buy any bedding annuals last year).

 

Love-in-a-Mist

Bought a little pot of seedlings at the farmers' market a few years ago.  Not a fan.  I do grow black cumin, and it looks pretty much the same, but it's an herb, so that's okay.  I like herbs!

Lupine, Russell

Grown from seed, wintersown, the purple in 2018, the pink in 2019. They started blooming their second year. 





 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Lewisia 

Lewisia is named for Meriwether Lewis, of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Although it's a native I have trouble keeping it alive.  It hates to have its roots wet, and I've never found the right spot for it.  I'll try again, it's just too lovely not to.   Yes, William Clark has a flower named for him too, Clarkia which I featured in G (godetia)!



 

 

 

 

 

 

 Next up?  Why M of course!




Comments

  1. I didn't know there were so many varieties of lavender.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And they're "making" more all the time! There are the English (hardier), French, and Spanish types, with many varieties in each type. The names are misleading, they aren't from England or France, just named that way. I have to be careful to only pick zone 8b and up ones, which limits me. I'd like yellow, but they are not as hardy.

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  2. They are all so gorgeous there's no way I could pick a favorite. Your yard has to be so amazing!

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    Replies
    1. I only show you the good parts! In a few months a lot of it will look nice, barring any new puppy damage.

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  3. Lewis and Clark! I never knew that! All of your flowers are amazing, especially the lupines. By the way, I thought love in a mist and black cumin were one and the same - I grew it once (from seed), back years ago when I lived in Arkansas. Wasn't a fan. I have one lavender plant. I've had trouble with them overwintering but this one (bought last year) made it!

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    Replies
    1. No, it's too fussy (not in care, in looks) for my taste. I grew it last year for my N (Nigella Satvia) in the A-Z Challenge, Herbs. It was a tiny seedling for the blog then!

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  4. L seems to be a bit easier than the last couple letters. Yay lavender.

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    Replies
    1. It was! Some more hard ones are in the future.

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  5. Lupines are a sure sign summer is coming here in Maine. They're beautiful.

    I found a great local farm that does lavender and purchased dried lavender for some vases. It's wonderful too.

    Weekends In Maine

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    Replies
    1. I love Lupine! I was thrilled the one was pink. I have some little ones, color unknown. Like growing yarrow from a mix. Who knows what I'll get? The purple had a horrid start, when it was young I had a disgusting earwig infestation and the leaves were nearly just veins on stems. (There's a post or two on that, but it's really icky!)

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  6. Replies
    1. Yes, and Crystal Palace is even better!

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