O - Oregon Natives and Others

 
Oregon Sunshine

Also called woolly sunflower.  You can see the woolliness in the second photo.  Alas, mine died.


Oregano 

I let my herbs flower for the bees.  They especially love oregano, ignoring the flowers sold as pollinators in favor of it.   I have five kinds of oregano, one young that hasn't flowered, one that doesn't flower (or rarely, golden oregano), and two are growing pretty much together so I can't tell which it is that's blooming.

This first is Dittany of Crete, which has striking purple bracts that hold the small flowers.  This is an ornamental oregano that grows wild in the Mediterranean, notably, Crete.

One of the two growing too closely together to tell them apart.  One is Greek Mountain, the other an unknown type I got in trade from some homeschooling books (along with my originally unobtrusive lemon balm).

Ox Eye Sunflower

I grew my two plants from seed a few years ago, and since they are perennial they keep coming back. This one is planted in the entirely wrong place, it's overshadowed by the coreopsis.

 Onion, Welsh

I did have allium for A, but only chives and ornamental onions.  This onion is an edible onion, although it does not form bulbs.  It's a type of bunching onion called Welsh onion.   I actually bought the seeds to grow it for the flowers.  Now, I enjoy the flowers and eat it too!  Oh, and as bunching onion, it's a perennial, so I don't have to plant onion sets or seed!


 

 How amazing is this?  You can see the flowers forming right through the skin, and it's like a little green house with humidity!

Oxalis 

Feel free to call it a weed, but it's a wildflower!  The top photo is the kind of oxalis I have in my yard (and I pull it out of some beds, leave it in others.  It's a very small, purple leaved variety.  The second photo is the oxalis that grew in my family's yard in CA.  Very tall with larger almost bell shaped flowers.  We'd pull out big handfuls of it when it got too invasive. 

The oxalis is on the left, a bit lower than the middle of the photo. 


One of my favorites is next on P day, but you'll have to wait until Monday!
Come back tomorrow though, I'm bound to post something.



Comments

  1. That is so cool how you can see the blooms under the skin. It's like it has it's own little greenhouse. Weekends In Maine

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    1. I know! It's amazing, and a bit creepy looking under its skin! :)

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  2. The Welsh onion is really awesome, my favorite today for sure!

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    1. I love how the petals emerge from the fuzzy part. I wish mine had lived. I ought to try again, it's a native.

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  4. I had looked into Welsh onion back years ago when I lived in Arkansas (zone 6 at the time - not quite surprised to find out it's considered zone 7 now) it's not hardy where I live but I sure like that mini-greenhouse it produces for itself. Wooly sunflower is a plant I have never heard of. Interesting, but the Monrovia website said it might not survive where I live. Sigh...

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    1. My zone has gotten warmer too. If that isn't proof of climate change nothing with convince the naysayers!

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  5. Some very interesting blooms.

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    1. Interesting is good! That's why I have so many kinds of herbs, each is a little bit different. Interesting.

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  6. That photo of the onion bud is amazing!! Work of art

    The Multicolored Diary

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    1. Thank you. Sometimes I surprise myself by how nice a photo comes out. I am using a very old iPhone camera. Sometimes it does a good job.

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  7. Oxalis are so pretty! I love these simple wildflowers

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    1. They are pretty. I always liked the tall kind in my yard growing up. Big bell shaped flowers. Mine are cute though. All are invasive though, in a garden bed.

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