S - Such a Spectacular Selection for Earth Day 2021!

The first Earth Day was held on April 22, 1970.  I wasn't aware of it then, being 13, living out of the country and being more concerned with 13 year old concerns.  I do remember taking my two youngest to a big event at what was then the Concord Pavilion.  

https://www.earthday.org/earth-day-2021/

 Sage and Salvia

Salvia is sage, and sage is salvia, but we usually refer to the kind we eat as "sage," and the ornamental as "salvia." Some are cold hardy, others are tender perennials or even annuals.

This is garden sage, the kind we eat.  If I was only interested in using it in cooking I'd cut off the flowers before they bloomed.  But, I grow it for the bees too.  There's plenty for me once the flowers fade.  Some people say it tastes better before flowering, but I never notice. 


Pineapple sage (ornamental)
 
 An absolutely stunning ornamental salvia that unfortunately is frost tender.  I had this one for several winters, and it came back until one year frost got it.  Bees and hummingbirds love this one even more than the purple flowers.

 
Autumn Sage, "Ultra Violet" (ornamental)
 
A hardier perennial.

 

Snapdragons 

Just that, pretty annuals that kids love to pinch to make the dragon snap!



Sea Thrift

A really pretty perennial I have growing in both my front yard and in the herb garden.  They don't like too much wet, which is why I moved one to the herb garden.  They spread, but slowly.

Succulents, Sedums, Stonecrops

String of Pearls - a houseplant that I had never seen bloom before this past year. 
 


Thanksgiving Cactus

What most people call "Christmas Cactus," and what are often sold in stores as "Christmas Cactus," are in fact Thanksgiving cactus.  They are two different plants, which are easily identified by the shape of the leaves.  See the toothed, sharp, leaves on mine?  Thanksgiving.  Christmas cactus leaves are rounded.  There's an Easter cactus too, but the flowers aren't the same, so they aren't usually mistaken for the other holiday cactus.

 

These next three are hardy outdoor succulents.  I used to think succulents were tender, but some withstand very cold temperatures.  

 Cape Blanco

Dragon's Blood

White Stonecrop

The bees swarm to this one!  It's a bit invasive for me.

Star of Bethlehem

An incredibly beautiful flower that grows from bulbs.  I hate it.  It's invasive and almost impossible to get rid of.  



Sweet William 
 
Very pretty, wonderful aroma, but too big.  Every mixed pollinator seed pack includes sweet William, but I only let one or two survive.  Two reasons, one is how large they get.  The other is they are biennial (grow their first year without blooming, bloom their second then die) and I don't like to give bed space to plants that have no flowers for a year, and don't make up for it by being perennial. 












Sunflower 

The common summer blooming annual is a must for me!  This is a traditional tall yellow one, but they also can be shorter, branched, red, brown, or fuzzy looking.

Sweet Peas 

Such a lovely aroma!  Remember though, sweet peas are NOT to eat, they are toxic!  The plants, leaves, stems, etc. look nothing like edible peas, so it should be easy to tell them apart.


Next up, the flowers of T.

 

Comments

  1. I love snap dragons. I usually grow some every year in containers by my front steps. Weekends In Maine

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    1. I do too, but I can't seem to grow them from seed.

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  2. You have such a beautiful garden, do you save the photo of the whole garden for the last post? Something like Zzzz as a bee zooming around flowers ;))

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    1. I will make a special post after Z showing my "gardens." There isn't one garden area in my yard. I have raised beds I have given names to. There's a Butterfly Garden, then the next year I made another so had to call it the Pollinator Garden. There are two Herb Garden areas. There's a lot you don't see, the disused areas, the dog-ravaged areas, etc! But, I'll show you the post after Z. I guess that's before the Reflections post. Your idea of Z is great! I'll see if I can find a bee on a Zinnia from past seasons!

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  3. Like usual beautiful flowers!

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  4. Beautiful collection of S flowers Lisa!

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  5. I planted some sunflowers last year (details on my post for today) and plant to do it again this year, with last year's seeds.

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  6. Cleveland Sage, an especially aromatic SoCal native, is one of my favorites!

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    1. I'm not familiar with that one. I see it's also called Blue Sage, which I have, buy mine is Mealy Cup sage, which I think is a terrible name. Well, I have seedling Mealy Cups, I am not sure they'll be much.

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  7. Not much of a sage fan. The flowers are pretty, though.

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    1. Yes, the flowers are a reason to grow it even if you don't like the taste. I use mine in stew, and one chicken recipe.

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  8. So many beautiful "S" flowers! Even to this day I love to snap the "dragons."

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    1. I remember my son snapped them so much and so hard he would break their "jaws!"

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  9. Whaaaaat! I did not know that about the Christmas cactus! (Then again, we don't have Thanksgiving...). Spectacular selection indeed! :)

    The Multicolored Diary

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    1. I didn't know it until fairly recently. They're always called Christmas cactus in my stores.

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  10. Ha ha, I love Star of Bethlehem! If you want to get rid of yours you could try the way we managed to eradicate ours: tear your whole house down and build another. lol
    Black and White: W for Workshop

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    1. That seems like it might be the only way! Some of mine are in a pot, so I could just dump it all and start over. The others keep popping up in one area that used to be lawn, now beds.

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