The Growable Calendar is Here (Almost)!

I was asked to take a look at something unique, something new to the market,

The Growable Calendar 

photo credit: primoza

The first calendar on the market with plantable seed paper! 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Developed by primoza, a young company in Bavaria, Germany, The Growable Calendar launched in 2018 and has been a huge success with gardeners there. 

photo credit: primoza

Yes, I was provided free samples in exchange for my thoughts, and I honestly love the idea and The Growable Calendar is a quality wall calendar, from the organic seeds to the beautiful hand-illustrations. 





 

 

 

 

There are two versions for release in the US, Canada, the UK and EU for 2022.

Jack of All Trades is perfect for beginners, with easy to care for flowers and vegetables.  "Easy to care for" does not mean the boring, same old stuff!  From January's curled cress through December's "Ox Heart" carrot, the year is filled with a wonderful mix of varieties.  Wild strawberry.  "German Winter" thyme.  Phacelia (what I know as purple tansy, an annual I grow every year because the bumblebees love it).  The Jack of all Trades calendar is a timeless calendar, meaning you can start at any time.

Back to the Roots  is the 2022 calendar, with 12 months of rare flower and vegetable seed paper that "help protect our planet's biodiversity." Strawberry spinach "Spikey" starts off the year, followed by wild mallow and "Blue" woodruff... coneflower, and into winter Winter Rocket!  

Both calendars are stuffed with fun facts and information on the plant of the month!   

When the month's over, simply tear out the seed tape, rip it into smaller pieces, plant as directed, and watch it grow!

I can verify the seeds grow really well, I've seen it with my own eyes!  I'm growing a selection from the Back to the Roots, and will keep you posted on the seeds' progress. 

photo credit: primoza

How will US gardeners be able to order their own The Growable Calendar?  primoza is launching a crowdfunding campaign this summer to bring it to the US.  Because primoza is just starting to go international, the calendars will only be available to those joining the campaign on Indiegogo.  So... sign up on the pre-launch site and get a special discount!  Official launch is July 13th, so don't delay!   You'll have your calendars before the holiday season, and you know a gardener who would love one for a holiday gift, right?  Use this special link to the pre-launch website for more information and videos about The Growable Calendar.


https://bit.ly/3v8aKif

 As primoza says, 

"Pot is Like it's Hot!"

my delivery box


 

Comments

  1. What a great idea! I'm going to check it out and may just get one for myself and maybe for a couple of gifts too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know it's exactly the sort of present I'd want to get! Usually I ask for bags of potting soil from our trash company! Really. Christmas, Mother's Day, Birthday... soil!

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  2. It's a great gift idea. I truthfully don't know if I would purchase it for myself; I like being in control of what I buy. And, I won't be the best seed starter in the world, if my past track record is any indication. Of course, on the other hand - I've heard of strawberry spinach, and Seed Savers lists it as "getting scarce".

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    Replies
    1. I know what you mean. On the other hand, it's fun to be provided things you wouldn't normally even try. I know most of these are things I haven't grown before. I shy away from carrots, and greens for two!

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  3. That is a great idea. I wonder, though, considering how different parts of the country have different climates, how the calendar would work country-wide.

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    Replies
    1. The seeds are suitable for different growing zones. I noticed the thyme is a cold tolerant one, more so than some thymes. Flowers are either annuals, or perennials like 'Red' coneflower which dies back in the cold, but comes back again. The seeds for winter months might not be plantable into the garden in snowy regions, but they are cool weather vegetables.

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